Scribner-Doyle rule or scale

A method of estimating the amount of lumber that can be cut from a saw-log. Also called the Doyle’s, Connecticut River, Scribner’s or Connecticut rule.

Let D be the diameter in inches of the small end of the log, inside the bark, and L the length of the log in feet. Then,

A formula. board feet equal L times a squared fraction.  The numerator is D minus 4 and the denominator is 4.

Measure the diameter of the small end of the log, inside the bark, in inches.  Subtract 4. Divide by 4. Square the result. Multiply by the length in feet.  The result, in board feet, is an estimate of the amount of lumber that can be cut from the log.

To use the calculator below, enter a diameter and length and click anywhere outside the boxes.

Scribner-Doyle Rule in American Law
Arkansas “the Doyle stick or standard”, compulsory Sec. 10481 (1901); Digest of the Statutes, Crawford & Moses, 1921, ch 113, sec. 6994.
Florida “Doyle’s rule and log book”, compulsory General Statutes, 1920, Div. 1, Title 11, ch. 39. Sec 2384 (1889).
Louisiana “'Scribner-Doyle' rule”, compulsory Statutes, 1920. vol. 3, page 2210.
Mississippi “the table known as 'Scribner’s lumber and log book by Doyle's rule'”, compulsory Hemingway's Ann. Code, 1917, ch 72, sec. 3355.
West Virginia "Doyle and Scribner’s combined rules", optional Acts, 1919, ch. 53.
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