French wire gauges

In addition to France, these gauges were used in Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Greece, Asia Minor, South America, and even to an extent in Germany, usually in competition with other gauges. They were used for wire and wire nails in the 19th and early 20th centuries.

Jauge de Paris 1857
Gauge Diameter
in millimeters
P15 0.15
P14 0.16
P13 0.17
P12 0.18
P11 0.20
P10 0.22
P9 0.23
P8 0.25
P7 0.27
P6 0.28
P5 0.30 (Some say 0.3100)
P4 0.34
P3 0.37 (Some say 0.3810)
P2 or PP 0.42
P1 0.46
P0 or P 0.50
1 0.60
2 0.70
3 0.80
4 0.90
5 1.00
6 1.10
7 1.20
8 1.30
9 1.40
10 1.5
11 1.6
12 1.8
13 2.0
14 2.2
15 2.4
16 2.7
17 3.0
18 3.4
19 3.9
20 4.4
21 4.9
22 5.4
23 5.9
24 6.4
25 7.0
26 7.6
27 8.2
28 8.8
29 9.4
30 10.0

Cl. de Laharpe.
Notes & Formules de L'Ingénieur et du Constructeur-Mécanicien. 7th ed.
Paris: E. Bernard & Cie. 1889.
Page 610.

Jauge Japy
Gauge Diameter
in millimeters
10 1.45
11 1.60
12 1.75
13 1.90
14 2.05
15 2.2
16 2.4
17 2.7
18 3.0
19 3.5
20 4.0
21 4.6
22 5.2
23 5.9
24 6.6
25 7.3
26 8.0
27 8.7
28 9.4
29 10.0
30 10.5
31 11.0
32 11.5
33 12.5
34 13.5
35 14.5
36 15.5
37 16.5
38 17.5
39 18.5
40 19.5
41 20.5
42 21.5
43 22.5
44 23.5

Hardware Tables, Formulae and Recipes... 6th edition. London: The Ironmonger, 1924. Pages 3 and 63, which differ.

Jauge de Limoges
Gauge Diameter
in millimeters
0 0.39
1 0.45
2 0.56
3 0.67
4 0.79
5 0.90
6 1.01
7 1.12
8 1.24
9 1.35
10 1.46
11 1.68
12 1.80
13 1.91
14 2.02
15 2.14
16 2.25
17 2.84
18 3.40
19 3.95
20 4.50
21 5.10
22 5.65
23 6.20
24 6.80

Cl. de Laharpe.
Notes & Formules de L'Ingénieur et du Constructeur-Mécanicien. 7th ed.
Paris: E. Bernard & Cie. 1889.
Page 610.

Jauge carcasse ou du commerce
Gauge Diameter
in millimeters
P 0.50
12 0.47
14 0.44
16 0.40
18 0.37
20 0.34
22 0.32
24 0.29
26 0.26
28 0.22
30 0.20
32 0.17
34 0.14
36 0.12
38 0.11
40 0.10
42 0.09
44 0.08
46 0.07
48 0.06
50 0.05

Cl. de Laharpe.
Notes & Formules de L'Ingénieur et du Constructeur-Mécanicien. 7th ed.
Paris: E. Bernard & Cie. 1889.
Page 610.

sources

1

There is no doubt but that English wire gauges have been largely used on the continent of Europe in former times, and especially the so-called Birmingham wire-gauge. At present this wire gauge is still used in Belgium, Russia, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark. The new standard gauge is only being introduced by degrees. In Germany, the Birmingham wire gauge was used up to the year 1878, although the ancient Westphalian wire gauge and also the French gauge (or jauge de Paris) were used besides, to a small extent. In 1872, the German wire drawers adopted the so-called millimetre wire gauge, which is at present used throughout Germany and Austria, other wire gauges only being used occasionally. The millimetre gauge indicates the size of wire by tenths of a millimetre, so that for instance the No. 42 wire would be 4.2 mm. thick, and No. 4 wire would be 0.4 mm. thick. Certain standard sizes are, however, adopted by preference, coming up very nearly to the old Birmingham wire gauge, say:

[For the values, see millimetre gauges]

As regards the system of measurement employed in Germany, wire gauges, i. e., plates of steel with notches representing the various sizes of wire, are still much used in the works, but in addition the micrometer or screw gauge is much employed, allowing the measurement of the size of wire to the smallest fraction of a millimetre.

In France, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Greece, and Asia Minor, the French gauge, and principally the so-called jauge de Paris of 1857, is used. This gauge indicates the size of wire by numbers having certain equivalents in millimetres; and, contrary to the Birmingham wire gauge, where the smallest number indicates the largest size, in the French gauge the smallest number indicates the smallest size.

The jauge 'japy,' similar to the jauge de Paris, but with slightly smaller sizes for the different numbers, is also used to some extent in France and Switzerland; for the finer wires, card wire, copper wire, etc., the so-called jauge 'carcasse' is in use.

With regard to Great Britain and the British colonies, they all now use the new standard wire gauge. In the United States of America, hitherto the Stubbs' Birmingham wire gauge has, we believe, been mostly used, besides Washburn & Moen's, and Brown and Sharpe's wire gauges.

If we are not mistaken there is a tendency in the United States to the adoption of the millimetre gauge. If this gauge should really be adopted in the states, the Americans will show that they are readier to take up an improvement than their English cousins, the millimetre gauge having been frequently proposed in England, but always declined on account of the conservative opposition it encountered. In South America both the Birmingham wire gauge or the new standard gauge and the jauge de Paris are used according to whether buyers have been accustomed to purchase in England or in France, the French imports of wire having of late been replaced by imports from Germany.

We are used to sell in the export market to whatever gauge may be desired.

In concluding, we beg to give you our opinion that the best system of measuring is the millimetre gauge, and that this gauge will be used to greater extent in the future; this will, however, greatly depend upon whether England will do away with her ancient system of measures, weights and money, and replace it by the far simpler metric system. This, we believe, is only a question of time.

A letter from Felten & Guilleaume, of Müllheim, near Cologne, "the largest makers in the world of iron and steel telegraph wire" replying to an inquiry from a M. Welles, who submitted it to The Electrical World. It subsequently appeared in The Electrician and Electrical Engineer, vol. 5, page 476 (Dec. 1885). Welles commented that “the statements made as to usage in different countries refer to line wire, and not to sheet metal, fine copper wires, etc.”

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