Berlin globe symbol, a link to Google map., Germany circa 1820
units of capacity

Dry capacity

             

Last Getreide

         

Last of oats or barley

           

Winspel

2

3

         

Malter

2

4

6

   

Berliner Scheffel

12

24

48

72

     

Viertel

4

48

96

128

192

   

Metze

4

16

192

384

768

1152

 

Mässchen

4

16

64

768

1536

3072

4608

before the law of 16 May 1816, in liters

0.86

3.42

13.68

54.73

656.8

1313.5

2627

3940

cubic Prussian Zoll

48

192

768

3072

36,864

73,728

147,456

221,184

liters

0.858

3.44

13.74

54.96

659.6

1319.1

2638.2

3957.2

The earlier values are calculated from a determination of the size of the “berliner kupferenen Probe-Scheffel” reported by J. A. Entelwein, as described in Chelius. (Copies of Entelwein's 1798 publication are so rare we have been unable to locate one.) That standard held 116 Pfund 23 1/9 Loth (Berlin weight) of distilled water at 14° Reaumur, which works out to 54.73 liters. For comparison, Kruse's figure, given in cubic pouce of the pied du roi, works out to 51.65 liters.

The post-1816 figures are calculated from the sizes in cubic Prussian Zoll, and agree with e.g., Nelkenbrecher and Doursther. For comparison, for the Scheffel Kelly gives 52.11 lliters.

Liquid capacity, for beer

             

Gebräude

       

Küpe or Kufe

9

         

Fass

2

18

       

Tonne

2

4

36

     

Ähmchen

4

8

16

144

   

Quart

24

96

192

384

3456

 

Oessel

2

48

192

384

768

6912

old, in liters

.585

1.170

28.08

112.32

224.64

449.28

4043.5

after 1816, in liters

.573

1.1450

27.48

109.92

219.84

439.68

3957.12

Sometime before 1840, the ratios for the smaller units underwent decimalization, producing:

             

Gebräude

       

Küpe or Kufe

9

         

Fass

2

18

       

Tonne

2

4

36

     

Ähmchen

4

8

16

144

   

Quart

25

100

200

400

3600

 

Oessel

2

50

200

400

800

7200

cubic Prussian Zoll

32

64

1600

6400

12,800

25,600

230,400

after 18??, in liters

.573

1.145

28.63

114.5

229.0

458.0

4122

Some probable errors in frequently quoted sources: Nelkenbrecher (13th ed., 1820) makes the Quart and Oessel synonymous; other sources of the same period do not. Kelly describes the Gebräude as 404.23 liters; the decimal point is misplaced.

Liquid capacity, for wine

               

Fuder

             

Oxhoft

4

           

Ohm

6

         

Eimer

2

3

12

       

Anker

2

4

6

24

   

Maas or Quart

32

64

128

192

768

   

Oesel

2

64

128

256

384

1536

Entelwein (via Chelius) cubic Zoll

~32.7

~65.4

~2092.8

~4185.6

~8371.2

~12557

~50227

liters

0.585

1.170

37.45

74.90

149.80

224.71

898.83

after 1816 cubic Zoll

32

64

2048

4096

8192

12,288

49,152

liters

0.5725

1.1450

36.64

73.28

146.56

219.83

879.34

The Zolls are Prussian Zolls. Note that the Oxhoft of wine and the Fass of beer are the same size.

The earlier values are calculated from a determination of the size of a tin (or pewter) Probe-Quart, dated 1722, tested by J. A. Entelwein, as described in Chelius. It held 79 ⁷⁄₈ Loths of distilled water at 14°R, 59 cubic pouce of the pied du roi, or 1170.346 milliliters. Kruse, however, states that the Berlin Quart or Maass contains 58 Paris cubic pouce.

Miscellaneous

Leinsaattonne (flaxseed tonne) = 37 ²⁄₃ Metzen, about 129.6 liters. One of the few old units that kept their value in the 1816 reform.

Prahm, for limestone and gypsum.

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