faggot

1

In England, by 43 Elizabeth I, a quantity of wood making a bundle 3 feet long and 24 inches around.

James Britten.
Old Country and Farming Words.
English Dialect Society, number 30.
London: Trübner and Co., 1880.

Page 170.

sources

1

Schedule of murage chargeable on divers goods.

for every thousand (millena) of “talwode” 4d.; for the same of “faget” 2d.; for the same of “bilet” ½d.;

Reginald R. Sharpe, editor.
Calendar of Letter-Books Preserved among the Archives of the City of London at the Guildhall.
Letter-Book H. Circa A.D. 1375-1399.

London: Printed by John Edward Francis, 1907.
Page 298.
Probably written 1386.

2

Fagots should be 3 Foot long, and in compasse 24 Inches, and they ought to be round, and not flat, for so they are much lesse, though they are all one compasse.

Henry Phillippes.
The Purchasers Pattern. 2nd ed., corrected and enlarged.
London: Printed for R. & W. Leybourn, for T. Pierrepont..., 1654.
Page 237.

2

In England, at least as early as the 17th century – 19th century(?) , a unit of mass used for steel bars, = 120 pounds. From the resemblance between a bundle of such bars and a faggot of wood. Also spelled fagot.

[John Worlidge].
Dictionarium Rusticum & Urbanicum: or, A Dictionary of all Sorts of Country Affairs, Handicraft, Trading, and Merchandizing…
London: J. Nicholson, 1704.

Simmonds, 1892. Page 147.

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