glug

A unit of mass proposed in 1957.ยน One glug is that mass which is accelerated by 1 centimeter per second per second by a force of one gram weight, so 1 glug = g grams = 0.980665 kilogram (where g is the standardized value for the force of gravity on Earth’s surface).

As the mass experiencing unit acceleration under standard force of gravity when the unit of mass in the system is taken as a unit of weight, the glug would play the same role in a cgs system that the slug does in the foot pound second system, and the name comes from gram-slug.  So far as we know, the unit was never actually used.

1.
Edward W. Price.
Letter to the editor: New unit of mass.
American Journal of Physics, volume 25, number 2, page 120 (1957).

A. David.
Letter to the editor: Beware of the “glug,” a new unit of mass.
American Journal of Physics, volume 26, number 1, page 41 (1958).

“The ‘glug’ ...should certainly not receive a place below the sun!”

Blake D. Mills.
Letter to the editor: New unit of mass.
American Journal of Physics, volume 27, number 1, page 62 (1959).

Mills says the glug is a preexisting “phonetic unit of liquid measure” in industrial chemistry, that is, the amount of liquid dispensed from a bottle when it makes the sound “glug.”

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