hnw

In ancient Egypt, a unit of capacity, about 0.48 liter (about 1 U.S. fluid pint). chart symbol

The hnw is the ancestral unit of many others, including the El-Amarna qina, the Ugaritic hn, the Egyptian Aramaic hyn, and the biblical Hebrew hîn. Many of these are much larger units.

sources

In addition to other documents, the Rhind Mathematical Papyrus, a hieratic manuscript that is dated internally to the 33rd year of the Hyksos king Apophis (Awserre)—thus ca. 1550 BCE, during the Second Intermediate Period—indicates in a section that deals with divisions and measurements of grain (not liquid!) that a hnw is 1/10 of a ḥḳ3t, and since the metric equivalent of a ḥḳ3t is ca. 4.8 litres, a hnw would be ca. 0.48 litres (Rossi 2007: 61 and Table 2). For a comprehensive study of the hnw, see Pommerening 2005: 195–223. Her discussion of the New Kingdom and Second Intermediate Period (idem: 203–205), the part of Egyptian history that surrounds the LB II and early Iron I at Tel Beth-Shemesh, shows that the hnw was the standard of measurement at this time in Egypt and that its value was 473 cm³ or 0.473 litres.

P. Kyle McCarter, Shlomo Bunimovitz and Zvi Lederman.
An Archaic Baʿl Inscription from Tel Beth-Shemesh.
Tel Aviv, vol. 38, pages 179–193 (2011).
doi 10.1179/033443511x13099584885385
Footnote 9, page 187. Their references are to:

Tanja Pommerening.
Die altägyptischen Hohlmaße.
(Studien zur altägyptischen Kultur, Beiheft 10).
Hamburg: Helmut Buske, 2005.

Corinna Rossi.
Architecture and Mathematics in Ancient Egypt.
Cambridge (UK): Cambridge University Press, 2007.

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