pose [French]

1

In the bilingual Swiss canton of Vaud (German: Waadt), a unit of land area. Prior to 1822 = 40,000 pieds carrées = 3440 square meters.¹

A law of 27 May 1822, effective 1 January 1823, metrified the canton's units, making the pied of Vaud (German: waadttändische Fuss) exactly 300 millimeters. This change rippled through the canton's units of land area, making the pose 4500 square meters.

     

pose or Juchart

   

fossorier

10

toise carrée or Quadrat-Klafter

50

500

pied carrée or Quadrat-Fuss

100

5000

50,000

.09
sq. m

9
sq. m

450
sq. m

4500
sq. m

In 1848 Jukart defined as = 400 square Ruthen. The Ruthe was made the same as the Vaud toise, 3 meters, making the new Swiss Jukart 9 sq. meters times 400 = 3600 sq. m. Conveniently, the pose of Vaud was thus exactly 1.25 Swiss Jucharts.²

It was also equal to the Morgen of the German principality of Baden. In their 1822 law Vaud was following the example of Baden, which by a metrication law of 10 November 1810 (really effective 1831) set their Fuss at 0.3 meters, making their Morgen 3600 square meters.³

1. Doursther, page 437.

2. Noback, vol 1, page 463.

3. Noback, vol 1, page 405, vide Karlsruhe.

2

In Geneva, there were two poses. The one also called a journal = 8 ouvrées or fossoyées = 400 square toise, each toise = 8 pieds de roi, = 2701.33 square meters.¹

The one also called a setine = 500 square toises =3376.66 square meters.¹

1. Doursther, page 437.

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